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Wait, WHAT?!?! – Your Brain Parasite IS Making You Sick – Here’s Why

“More than 30 million Americans are infected with a brain parasite (Toxoplasma gondii) spread by cats and contaminated meat, but most will never show symptoms. A new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine explains why, and that finding could have important implications for brain infections, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune disorders.”

[ “Cat people” = brain parasites = Easily manipulated Demo(n)crats? ]

ANON OPINES – I am starting to recognize a pattern that exposes most human maladies are related to parasites’ of one form or another, and that many diseases and “conditions” are potentially CURED with drugs like HCQ and Ivermectin. This might explain why these established safe drugs are demonized once the public becomes aware of them. These simple, cheap, safe, generic drugs could end so much suffering that the Controllers rely on for power and profit.

[ People are the only “domesticated” mammals in America that are NOT on any scheduled treatment for parasite infections. Why? If the article is right about 30-million infected, it makes even less sense. ]

“T. gondii has been shown to alter the behavior of infected rodents in ways that increase the rodents’ chances of being preyed upon by felids.[7][8][9] Support for this “manipulation hypothesis” stems from studies showing that T. gondii-infected rats have a decreased aversion to cat urine.[7] Because cats are the only hosts within which T. gondii can sexually reproduce to complete and begin its lifecycle, such behavioral manipulations are thought to be evolutionary adaptations that increase the parasite’s reproductive success.[7] Rats that do not avoid cats’ habitations will more likely become cat prey.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasma_gondii

“The tissue cyst-forming coccidium Toxoplasma gondii is one of the more polyxenous parasites known to date. It has a facultatively heteroxenous life cycle and can probably infect all warm-blooded animals (mammals and birds) and humans. T. gondii is prevalent in most areas of the world and is of veterinary and medical importance, because it may cause abortion or congenital disease in its intermediate hosts. Because of its great importance as a causative agent of a zoonosis T. gondii has been studied most intensively among the coccidia. To date, more than 15 000 original research articles, more than 500 reviews, and several books and book chapters have been published on this parasite (Table 1). However, there are still many aspects of its biology, natural life cycle, and the epidemiology of T. gondii infections of which we know relatively little.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3109627/

“Toxoplasma gondii is known to change the host’s behaviour. Studies show the capability for the parasite to make rats fearless near cats. This indicates the evolutionary need for Toxoplasma gondii to get inside felines. When a rat is eaten by a cat the parasite gets inside the primary host. There have been a few studies with humans, too. Some results indicate a strong correlation between schizophrenia and toxoplasmosis. According to some studies women with toxoplasmosis are more likely to cheat their husbands. Men with the parasite have shown to be more aggressive. Infected humans also have slower reaction times.”

https://www.parasitesinhumans.org/toxoplasma-gondii.html

(2003) “Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that infectious agents may contribute to some cases of schizophrenia. In animals, infection with Toxoplasma gondii can alter behavior and neurotransmitter function. In humans, acute infection with T. gondii can produce psychotic symptoms similar to those displayed by persons with schizophrenia. Since 1953, a total of 19 studies of T. gondii antibodies in persons with schizophrenia and other severe psychiatric disorders and in controls have been reported; 18 reported a higher percentage of antibodies in the affected persons; in 11 studies the difference was statistically significant. Two other studies found that exposure to cats in childhood was a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. Some medications used to treat schizophrenia inhibit the replication of T. gondii in cell culture. Establishing the role of T. gondii in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia might lead to new medications for its prevention and treatment.”

“Toxoplasma gondii is known to change the host’s behaviour. Studies show the capability for the parasite to make rats fearless near cats. This indicates the evolutionary need for Toxoplasma gondii to get inside felines. When a rat is eaten by a cat the parasite gets inside the primary host. There have been a few studies with humans, too. Some results indicate a strong correlation between schizophrenia and toxoplasmosis. According to some studies women with toxoplasmosis are more likely to cheat their husbands. Men with the parasite have shown to be more aggressive. Infected humans also have slower reaction times.”

https://www.parasitesinhumans.org/toxoplasma-gondii.html

(2003) “Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that infectious agents may contribute to some cases of schizophrenia. In animals, infection with Toxoplasma gondii can alter behavior and neurotransmitter function. In humans, acute infection with T. gondii can produce psychotic symptoms similar to those displayed by persons with schizophrenia. Since 1953, a total of 19 studies of T. gondii antibodies in persons with schizophrenia and other severe psychiatric disorders and in controls have been reported; 18 reported a higher percentage of antibodies in the affected persons; in 11 studies the difference was statistically significant. Two other studies found that exposure to cats in childhood was a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. Some medications used to treat schizophrenia inhibit the replication of T. gondii in cell culture. Establishing the role of T. gondii in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia might lead to new medications for its prevention and treatment.”

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/9/11/03-0143_article

“Toxoplasmosis is a flu-like, infectious disease caused by a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii parasite. The Toxoplasma gondii parasite is attracted to mostly warm-blooded animals and human beings. This disease has flu-like symptoms and spreads from consuming undercooked meat, sometimes if exposed to infected cat faeces. In the case of human beings, if a pregnant female has Toxoplasmosis, she can pass it on to her foetus. The suborder Coccidia includes microscopic, spore-forming parasites that fall under class Conoidasida. Since this parasite feeds on intermediate hosts like birds, animals like cats and even human beings, they are found in abundance all over the world. It has the ability to survive in different environments.”

https://byjus.com/biology/toxoplasmosis-life-cycle/

“Toxoplasma gondii reproduces sexually in felines and asexually in virtually all warm-blooded animals, including humans. This obligate intracellular parasite alternates between biologically distinct developmental stages throughout its complex life cycle. Stage conversion is crucial for T. gondii transmission, persistence, and the maintenance of genetic diversity within the species. Genome-wide comparative transcriptomic studies have contributed invaluable insights into the regulatory gene networks underlying T. gondii development.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32931908/

“Toxoplasma gondii represents one of the most common parasitic infections in the world. The asexual cycle can occur within any warm-blooded animal, but the sexual cycle is restricted to the feline intestinal epithelium. T. gondii is acquired through consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat as well as food and water contaminated with oocysts. Once ingested, it differentiates into a rapidly replicating asexual form and disseminates throughout the body during acute infection. After stimulation of the host immune response, T. gondii differentiates into a slow-growing, asexual cyst form that is the hallmark of chronic infection. One-third of the human population is chronically infected with T. gondii cysts, which can reactivate and are especially dangerous to individuals with reduced immune surveillance. Serious complications can also occur in healthy individuals if infected with certain T. gondii strains or if infection is acquired congenitally. No drugs are available to clear the cyst form during the chronic stages of infection. This therapeutic gap is due in part to an incomplete understanding of both host and pathogen responses during the progression of T. gondii infection. While many individual aspects of T. gondii infection are well understood, viewing the interconnections between host and parasite during acute and chronic infection may lead to better approaches for future treatment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of what is known and unknown about the complex relationship between the host and parasite during the progression of T. gondii infection, with the ultimate goal of bridging these events.”

“Toxoplasmosis is a flu-like, infectious disease caused by a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii parasite. The Toxoplasma gondii parasite is attracted to mostly warm-blooded animals and human beings. This disease has flu-like symptoms and spreads from consuming undercooked meat, sometimes if exposed to infected cat faeces. In the case of human beings, if a pregnant female has Toxoplasmosis, she can pass it on to her foetus. The suborder Coccidia includes microscopic, spore-forming parasites that fall under class Conoidasida. Since this parasite feeds on intermediate hosts like birds, animals like cats and even human beings, they are found in abundance all over the world. It has the ability to survive in different environments.”

https://byjus.com/biology/toxoplasmosis-life-cycle/

“Toxoplasma gondii reproduces sexually in felines and asexually in virtually all warm-blooded animals, including humans. This obligate intracellular parasite alternates between biologically distinct developmental stages throughout its complex life cycle. Stage conversion is crucial for T. gondii transmission, persistence, and the maintenance of genetic diversity within the species. Genome-wide comparative transcriptomic studies have contributed invaluable insights into the regulatory gene networks underlying T. gondii development.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32931908/

“Toxoplasma gondii represents one of the most common parasitic infections in the world. The asexual cycle can occur within any warm-blooded animal, but the sexual cycle is restricted to the feline intestinal epithelium. T. gondii is acquired through consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat as well as food and water contaminated with oocysts. Once ingested, it differentiates into a rapidly replicating asexual form and disseminates throughout the body during acute infection. After stimulation of the host immune response, T. gondii differentiates into a slow-growing, asexual cyst form that is the hallmark of chronic infection. One-third of the human population is chronically infected with T. gondii cysts, which can reactivate and are especially dangerous to individuals with reduced immune surveillance. Serious complications can also occur in healthy individuals if infected with certain T. gondii strains or if infection is acquired congenitally. No drugs are available to clear the cyst form during the chronic stages of infection. This therapeutic gap is due in part to an incomplete understanding of both host and pathogen responses during the progression of T. gondii infection. While many individual aspects of T. gondii infection are well understood, viewing the interconnections between host and parasite during acute and chronic infection may lead to better approaches for future treatment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of what is known and unknown about the complex relationship between the host and parasite during the progression of T. gondii infection, with the ultimate goal of bridging these events.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26335719/